Skip to main content

About your Search

20121001
20121031
Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18 (some duplicates have been removed)
's closing weeks, molly ball of "the atlantic," gloria borger of cnn, susan davis of "u.s.a. today"," and james kitfield of "national journal." >> award-winning reporting and analysis, covering history as it happens. live from our nation's capital, this is "washington week" with gwen ifill. produced in associated with "national journal." corporate funding for "washington week" be provided by -- ♪ >> wherever our trail blazers -- trains divorce, the economy comes to live. norfolk southern. one line, infinity possibilities the >> we know why we're here. to chart a greener path in the air and in our factories. >> to find cleaner, more efficient ways to power flight. >> and harness our technology for new energy solutions. >> around the globe, the people of boeing are working together to build a belter tomorrow. >> that's why we're here. additional funding is also provided by the annenberg foundation, the corporation for public broadcasting, and by contributions to your pbs stations from viewers like you. once again, live from washington, moderator gwen ifill. gwen: good evening. it's
to be made about whether the u.s. had done all it could to protect the citizens on the ground there. that's not the argument we saw. >> it wasn't. you're right. the voter who asked the question, and this was a town hall-style debate, asked why -- who made the decision not to provide more security when it was requested and why and the president didn't answer. he did say, i take ultimate responsibility. what happened there was my responsibility. but he didn't really answer that question. instead it became as you say a semantic debate. a terrorist act. it kind of got lost i think. governor romney's larger point is that the administration didn't really own up to what really happened in benghazi until a number of days and weeks had passed and attributed it too much to this idea of a pro test which now seems not to have happened over this antiislam video. and president obama was able to sort of like derail that critique by focusing on the small aspect which candy tried to correct on both sides. he said the president did say it was an act of terror and he pointed out that governor romney had a l
in and it had very little to do with talking about the u.s. foreign policy. >> right. there was the expected clash of world views. romney has been bush -- pushing the idea of american exceptionalism, the very muscular view of foreign policy, pushing, and right down the line , but that romney didn't show up for the debate. he pulled himself very close to president obama's positions on pulling the troops out of afghanistan in 2014, on not introducing military forces into the crisis in syria, on crippling sanctions in iran and it was really stunning. gwen: did the specifics matter or was this about both of them trying to look like the commander fdemeef >> it was a good strategy on romney's part, iroda tulyaganovaly. the public suffered from not having two candidates with two very different inextincts -- instincts on foreign policy, but this is where he has stumbled. whenever he has gotten into the foreign policy arena, he has stumbled. in the second debate he challenged president obama on calling what happened in benghazi an act of terror the this time he just looked presidential. i think that
is raising questions about what the administration knew about the deadly attack on the u.s. consulate in benghazi, libya. >> there are more questions that came out of last night. because the vice president directly contradicted the sworn testimony of state department officialings. he's doubling down on denial. gwen: so karen, is this coming down to a game of who do you trust? >> i think it is. and it's also coming down to a game of how each one of them defines the other. and with mitt romney, i think we've seen something pretty extraordinary over the last week and a half. starting the day before the last debate. where he is once again sort of very visibly kind of trying to position himself at least in tone and in emphasis, much more toward the middle. gwen: jeff, is this part of the overall strategy for both sides to do this? not to position to the middle but to find some key way of driving in and making the point that they -- that the other guy is not working? >> it is. and it's -- everything that's happening right now is about leadership. i mean, we're talking about benghazi and we'
Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18 (some duplicates have been removed)

Terms of Use (31 Dec 2014)